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These days there are millions of places to get your work published. Right? Right. But – and this is a big one – not all publishing outlets are created equal. You build up your brand, network and expertise over a number of years and, while you can publish a blog through Medium, sure, or even just post it as a threaded Twitter update, will it get the same reach as doing it through an L&D publisher? Maybe, but probably not.

Take TJ – we’ve been around in one form or another since the 1960s, would you believe it. People publish their stories and opinions with us because of our heritage, our experience and (according to the recent member survey) our even-handedness and openness.

And if you’re a charity that’s done a great piece of work worth shouting about, perhaps some tech-enabled learning that’s got some great results or broke new ground, we want to hear about it. There are several ways to get your ideas across too, so do it the way that works best for you. Shall we have a look at what they are?

1. Press releases
Quick and factual.

Do:

  • Include all the info needed in the first paragraph
  • Expect a delay in replying
  • Follow up personally with everyone you sent it to

Don’t:

  • Forget to sanity check the recipient list
  • Be offended if you get turned down
  • Make it over 500 words

2. Opinion pieces
The place to be opinionated – the option to take if your idea is part of a bigger picture

Do:

  • Be opinionated
  • Link to reports/studies that you are citing
  • Follow up to see if the editor received the email

Don’t:

  • Use the first person plural (it’s too salesy)
  • Go over 1000 words

3. Podcast interviews
A more personal touch.

Do:

  • Prepare
  • Use Skype audio if you can
  • Treat it like a normal phone conversation

Don’t:

  • Read word-for- word off a script
  • Worry about repeating yourself or stuttering
  • Go over 20 minutes

4. Videos
An even more personal touch!

Do:

  • Speak up – good audio is more important than the video itself
  • Watch your eyeline – if you’re asked to look at the interviewer or down the camera lens, try to stick to it
  • Be honest – authenticity pays off

Don’t:

  • Worry about fluffing your lines – it’s all in the editing

 5. Email Q&As
Quick to turn around, and a good option if you need to plan what you want to say.

Do:

  • Address the questions – it’s not a sales exercise
  • Add humour if you need

Don’t:

  • Give short answers.

So next time you do a piece of work that makes a co-worker sit back and go – wow, everyone needs to hear about this, have a think about how and where the best place to tell people about that work is. We’re here to help you tell your story.


Jon Kennard,
Training Journal
@TrainingJournal